Professor John Roberts

Condensed from newsletters posted on http://www.jrmundialist.org/

… a bombshell … on 6 August 1945 an atom bomb annihilated Hiroshima.

That brutal event brought all my thinking up till then into one fused whole. I became a world citizen, more or less overnight.

Increasingly my thoughts return to the overwhelming need for all of us to think (and then act) as world citizens, conscious of a primary loyalty not to our local nationalism but to the human race (however confused and divided) as a whole.

The vast majority of people in western countries (and elsewhere) have been brought up as nationalists. Their schooling and homes have inculcated into them ideas about the differences and usually an assumed superiority to neighbours. These have led on, either openly or covertly, to many ideas and myths that have made it difficult or impossible to see the world except through a prism of distorting xenophobia or misanthropy. Few escape this.

The world has a vast collection of blind leaders, much of whose time and effort is spent persuading their peoples that they can and will lead them to peace, prosperity and all the benefits of modern science, only if their precepts are followed.

In fact, this led to two world wars that ruined millions of people and destroyed vast areas of many countries and to two global financial catastrophes, innumerable lesser conflicts and a ‘Cold’ War that lasted 45 years.

Attempts were made to reform the global political system. The League of Nations and the United Nations were the most notable but they have failed to ensure a world of peace where human beings could spend their lives in co-operation, instead of preparing for the next round of conflict. Nothing was done to improve the world’s political structures on a scale commensurate with the size of the challenge facing humanity.

Our positive economic activity often consists largely of military spending and attempts to bolster the economies of particular countries regardless of the wellbeing of others. These measures are accompanied by diplomacy and spying aimed at backing up military power to threaten or intimidate other countries or to protect domestic tyrannies.

To address the connected series of diverse challenges facing us: global climate change; financial collapse; economic depression; over-population in several continents; poverty and sickness of millions and tyranny in a number of countries, will require the present nationalist focus of political theories and polities to be replaced by a world citizen mindset, stressing positive humanity.

So… why become a world citizen – not necessarily explicitly, but in thought, word and deed? Because there is no alternative, if we wish our civilization, good and bad, to survive. We have little time left in which to choose our path.

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One Response to Professor John Roberts

  1. greenmuslima says:

    Re: “So… why become a world citizen – not necessarily explicitly, but in thought, word and deed? Because there is no alternative, if we wish our civilization, good and bad, to survive. We have little time left in which to choose our path.” – Amen! In peace, Rianne