‘War is out – definitely out’: ‘the only winning move is not to play’

In the Friend many years ago, a Yorkshire solicitor, Leonard Bird – author of Costa Rica-The Unarmed Democracy – wrote that ‘War is out – definitely out’. He could not understand any justification for war which ‘increases deaths, mutilation, refugees and intensifies human suffering’.

He saw the tacit acceptance of war as the consequence of the tremendous pressure of generations of belief in militarism and war, believing that ‘Friends’ task is to question and challenge this – and whatever excuses and apparent justification may be offered – on all occasions.

In effect Britain has been at war since 1991, using military and economic weapons, with several areas of the Middle East beset by aerial bombing aided by British information and ‘logistical support’. Why is there not a strong enough movement in our country to put an end to this criminal waste of lives and resources?

By chance the writer came across a photograph (below) which dispels the idea of resistance by solitary individuals as the numbers marching can be seen far into the background – no mean feat to gather such numbers when communication was limited to the telephone – and ‘ordinary people’ had no such luxuries in their homes.

It would be comparatively simple now to communicate with thousands, but feelings of powerlessness still lead the majority of people to accept the status quo – as long as their immediate family does not suffer. No such feelings hamper the vested interests who perpetuate these conflicts which assist their acquisition of money and power.

Those who accept war, despite its consequent  deaths, mutilation, refugees and intensified human suffering’ may listen with more respect to the pragmatic approach taken by former Indian Army officer Raghu Raman who worked in the corporate sector before joining the Indian Government as CEO of the National Intelligence Grid:

“In the 1983 film WarGames, a nuclear war simulation is accidentally started by a supercomputer designed to take over in the event of the Cold War spiralling out of control. After evaluating all the possibilities, the computer declares that “war is a strange game, in which the only winning move is not to play.”

Raman ends: “That advice is possibly truest for India right now”.

And further:  a universal truth for all countries.

 

 

 

 

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